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How to get control over files and folders in Windows

There are times when you need to take control over files and folders. Mostly it is required to be able to delete or move them.
Windows gives us some simple command line tools to gain access to those files and folders.

TakeOwn: Gives a user (current user if no user is specified) complete control of the particular file(s) or folder(s)
iCacls: Gives the administrator group, full permissions (in this case) over the file(s) and folder(s)

Usage:
For Files:
takeown /f file_name
icacls file_name /grant administrators:F
 
 
For Folders (recursively):
takeown /f directory_name /r /d y
icacls directory_name /grant administrators:F /t

The files or folders could be hidden and you might want to see, esp. if the files are system files. For this use the attrib command to reset the hidden and system attributes.

Use it as (for both files and folders):
attrib -h -r -s /s /d pathname

These commands can be clubbed in a single batch file and the file / folder name can be passed as a parameter and can be accessed as "%1" in the batch file.
Try more options to suit your requirements!
- Vivek

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